Israel’s Mainstream Political Parties Should Be Courting Arab Voters

July 25 2019

In the 2015 Knesset election, the various Arab parties in Israel joined together into a single bloc, thus garnering thirteen of 120 seats. But this unity proved short-lived. In the elections this past April, different parties ran separately, leading to two of them dividing ten seats between them. With new elections scheduled for September, these parties are undergoing the same splintering and instability as the rest of the Israel political system. Eyal Zisser sees this state of affairs as an opportunity:

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Read more at Israel Hayom

More about: Israeli Arabs, Israeli politics

The U.S. Has Managed to Force a Stalemate in the Syrian Civil War, at Least for Now

In a little remarked-upon statement in May, James Jeffrey, the State Department’s envoy for Syria policy, said that his goal was to turn the war-torn country into “a quagmire for the Russians.” By using economic leverage, this policy has achieved modest success, writes Jonathan Spyer:

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Read more at Foreign Policy

More about: Bashar al-Assad, Russia, Syrian civil war, U.S. Foreign policy