Students for Justice in Palestine Doesn’t Care About Justice—or Even Health—for Palestinians

At the University of Maryland last week, the campus chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP), ever eager to blame Israel for anything and everything, held an event titled “Corona and Countering the Occupation.” To her surprise, Naomi Grant found that the speaker’s various perversions of the truth didn’t include libelous accusations that Israel has been deliberately spreading coronavirus among Palestinians. Indeed, the speaker was forced to admit that Israeli-Palestinian cooperation has helped curb the disease’s spread. The most telling moment came when the audience began to ask questions:

The first student to raise his hand asked the obvious question: “What can we do to help?” She struggled to answer, then finally suggested, “I don’t know, maybe donate medical supplies?”

The response is emblematic of SJP and other groups affiliated with the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) movement—they have no plausible solutions to assist the people they profess to care about. They’re clueless when it comes to understanding the needs of the Palestinians, and don’t support initiatives that could help them.

Putting aside the fact that the average undergraduate doesn’t have respirators, tracheotomy equipment, or even basic supplies lying around, or the financial wherewithal to purchase them, both Hamas and the Palestinian Authority (PA) have a history of obstructing the flow of health aid and medical supplies into the territories that they govern. In May 2018, Hamas denied entry into Gaza to two truckloads of Israeli medical equipment. In June 2017, hospitals in Gaza were short of essential medicines by one-third, and over 270 pieces of medical equipment were needed in operating rooms, because the PA had refused to send medical supplies for three months.

If SJP wanted to improve Palestinians’ quality of life, they’d galvanize opposition to the brutal and corrupt Hamas and PA, and demand that these governments provide necessities like medical supplies to their citizens—and that militants stop hiding weapons in schools and hospitals. But SJP doesn’t actually care about justice for Palestinians; its prime goal is to promote the demonization of Israel, all while uplifting virulently anti-Israel students on campus as paragons of virtue and the voice of the oppressed.

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Read more at Algemeiner

More about: BDS, Coronavirus, Hamas, Israel on campus, Palestinian Authority, Students for Justice in Palestine

 

The New Iran Deal Will Reward Terrorism, Help Russia, and Get Nothing in Return

After many months of negotiations, Washington and Tehran—thanks to Russian mediation—appear close to renewing the 2015 agreement concerning the Iranian nuclear program. Richard Goldberg comments:

Under a new deal, Iran would receive $275 billion of sanctions relief in the first year and $1 trillion by 2030. [Moreover], Tehran would face no changes in the old deal’s sunset clauses—that is, expiration dates on key restrictions—and would be allowed to keep its newly deployed arsenal of advanced uranium centrifuges in storage, guaranteeing the regime the ability to cross the nuclear threshold at any time of its choosing. . . . And worst of all, Iran would win all these concessions while actively plotting to assassinate former U.S. officials like John Bolton, Mike Pompeo, and [his] adviser Brian Hook, and trying to kidnap and kill the Iranian-American journalist Masih Alinejad on U.S. soil.

Moscow, meanwhile, would receive billions of dollars to construct additional nuclear power plants in Iran, and potentially more for storage of nuclear material. . . . Following a visit by the Russian president Vladimir Putin to Tehran last month, Iran reportedly started transferring armed drones for Russian use against Ukraine. On Tuesday, Putin launched an Iranian satellite into orbit reportedly on the condition that Moscow can task it to support Russian operations in Ukraine.

With American and European sanctions on Russia escalating, particularly with respect to Russian energy sales, Putin may finally see net value in the U.S. lifting of sanctions on Iran’s financial and commercial sectors. While the return of Iranian crude to the global market could lead to a modest reduction in oil prices, thereby reducing Putin’s revenue, Russia may be able to head off U.S. secondary sanctions by routing key transactions through Tehran. After all, what would the Biden administration do if Iran allowed Russia to use its major banks and companies to bypass Western sanctions?

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Read more at Dispatch

More about: Iran nuclear deal, Russia, U.S. Foreign policy