The Unholy Alliance between Islamist Terrorists and Western Human-Rights Groups

Last week, Hamas issued a statement praising Human Rights Watch (HRW)—an international organization that under its current leadership has demonstrated an obsessive interest in libeling Israel. HRW earned the terrorist group’s praise for a report alleging that Arab Israelis face a “housing shortage” due to “discriminatory land policies.” Bassam Tawil comments:

The HRW report focuses on only three Arab towns in Israel, . . . with a total population of 50,000. It deliberately ignores the other two million or so Arab Israelis. Moreover, the report fails to mention that the housing crisis affects not only Arabs, but also Jews. The good news is that Israel has been working hard in recent years to solve the housing crisis—for both Arabs and Jews. In 2015, the Israeli government decided to implement the Economic Development Plan, a multi-year plan of about $12.3 billion, targeting issues such as planning, employment, transportation, and education in the Arab sector.

Hamas, meanwhile, has done virtually nothing to solve the debilitating housing crisis of the two million Palestinians living under its rule in the Gaza Strip. The truth is that Hamas cares nothing for either the Palestinians in the Gaza Strip or the Arabs living in Israel. Hamas has one single concern: advancing its goal of destroying Israel and murdering Jews.

Hamas’s war against Israel is waged with rockets and suicide bombings; organizations such as HRW wage war against Israel with propaganda designed to dismantle the state by making it unable to defend itself. Welcome to the unholy alliance between Muslim terrorists and anti-Israel human-rights organizations in the West.

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Read more at Gatestone

More about: Hamas, Human Rights Watch, Israeli Arabs, Palestinian terror

Reforms to Israel’s Judiciary Must Be Carefully Calibrated

The central topic of debate in Israel now is the new coalition government’s proposed reforms of the nation’s judiciary and unwritten constitution. Peter Berkowitz agrees that reform is necessary, but that “the proper scope and pace of reform, however, are open to debate and must be carefully calibrated.”

In particular, Berkowitz argues,

to preserve political cohesiveness, substantial changes to the structure of the Israeli regime must earn support that extends beyond these partisan divisions.

In a deft analysis of the conservative spirit in Israel, bestselling author Micah Goodman warns in the Hebrew language newspaper Makor Rishon that unintended consequences flowing from the constitutional counterrevolution are likely to intensify political instability. When a center-left coalition returns to power, Goodman points out, it may well repeal through a simple majority vote the major changes Netanyahu’s right-wing coalition seeks to enact. Or it may use the legislature’s expanded powers, say, to ram through laws that impair the religious liberty of the ultra-Orthodox. Either way, in a torn nation, constitutional counterrevolution amplifies division.

Conservatives make a compelling case that balance must be restored to the separation of powers in Israel. A prudent concern for the need to harmonize Israel’s free, democratic, and Jewish character counsels deliberation in the pursuit of necessary constitutional reform.

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Read more at RealClearPolitics

More about: Israel & Zionism, Israeli Judicial Reform