Israel Stands to Gain Little from Talks with Lebanon

Oct. 22 2020

Last week, Jerusalem and Beirut began negotiations, with U.S. mediation, over demarcating the maritime border between the two countries. Should they reach an agreement, Lebanon might be better able to exploit its offshore natural-gas resources in the same ways that Israel has. The most optimistic supporters of the talks believe they could lead to bilateral economic cooperation and eventually peace. But Tony Badran and Michael Doran argue that, to the contrary, the negotiations only lend credibility to a Hizballah-led government, and perhaps a way out of its economic crisis, but offer little to the Jewish state. (Interview by Gadi Taub. Video, one hour.)

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Read more at Shomer Saf

More about: Hizballah, Israel diplomacy, Lebanon, Natural Gas, U.S. Foreign policy

“I Had the Good Fortune to Be a Jew Born and Raised in the USA”

Nov. 26 2021

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died on Friday at the age of eighty-seven. Among much else, Ginsburg was one of the most prominent Jews in American public life. Herewith, her remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in 2004 on the occasion of Yom Hashoah:

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: American Jewry, Supreme Court, Theodor Herzl, Yom Hashoah