China’s Crackdown on Religion Hasn’t Overlooked Judaism

As Beijing’s persecution of its Muslim population has grown ever greater in scope and cruelty, and its persecution of Christians who dissent from the state-controlled denominations continues unabated, it has also repressed the practice of Judaism. The Jewish community of Kaifeng, which dates back to the Middle Ages, had been absorbed into the Gentile population by the 19th century, but in the 1990s a revival began among people of Jewish descent, some of whom began to use the site where the synagogue once stood for prayer. But no longer, writes Wang Yichi:

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Read more at Bitter Winter

More about: Anti-Semitism, China, Freedom of Religion, Judaism, Kaifeng

 

How the U.S. Can Get Smart about Promoting Democracy and Human Rights in the Middle East

Sept. 27 2021

Considering the current state of the region and the policy mistakes of the recent past, David Pollock and Robert Satloff outline a strategy that is “both virtuous and realistic” for defending human rights and encouraging democratization in a region plagued by autocracy, chaos, and brutality. They argue that “in the long run, more democratic, tolerant, and inclusive governments are likely to be better at defending themselves, and more reliable and effective security partners for the United States.”

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Read more at Washington Institute for Near East Policy

More about: Arab democracy, Human Rights, Middle East, U.S. Foreign policy