China’s Crackdown on Religion Hasn’t Overlooked Judaism

As Beijing’s persecution of its Muslim population has grown ever greater in scope and cruelty, and its persecution of Christians who dissent from the state-controlled denominations continues unabated, it has also repressed the practice of Judaism. The Jewish community of Kaifeng, which dates back to the Middle Ages, had been absorbed into the Gentile population by the 19th century, but in the 1990s a revival began among people of Jewish descent, some of whom began to use the site where the synagogue once stood for prayer. But no longer, writes Wang Yichi:

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Read more at Bitter Winter

More about: Anti-Semitism, China, Freedom of Religion, Judaism, Kaifeng

 

With Its Threats against Israel, the EU Undermines International Law

The office of the European Union’s president, along with several member states, have made clear that they will consider taking punitive actions against Jerusalem should it go through with plans to extend its sovereignty over parts of the West Bank. In the assessment of EU diplomats, Israel has no legitimate claims to land outside the 1949 armistice lines—the so-called “1967 lines”—and any attempt to act as if it does violates the Fourth Geneva Convention. But, to David Wurmser, this entire argument is based on a poor reading of the law:

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Read more at National Review

More about: European Union, International Law, West Bank