The British Government Has Condemned a Two-Year-Old Jewish Girl to Death. Her Parents Are Fighting Back

July 20 2021

Due to severe birth defects, two-year-old Alta Fixsler has been on a ventilator her entire life, and requires round-the-clock medical care. When her doctors at the Manchester children’s hospital determined that she has “no conscious awareness” and should be removed from life-support, her ḥasidic parents decided to take her either to the U.S. or to Israel, where doctors have offered to treat her. But Britain won’t allow it. Jon Levine writes:

The family has been fighting for Alta in British courts since 2019, and has faced a string of losses as the case slowly wound its way through the legal system. . . . So far, the British government has refused to allow Alta to leave. The issue is not one of red tape, but rather the wish of her current doctors not to see her life extended elsewhere, court papers show.

“It cannot be said to be in Alta’s best interests to be transferred to Israel for life-sustaining treatment to continue,” ruled the Court of Appeal’s Justice Alistair MacDonald in his June decision.

“There is no reason to kill my daughter like this,” [the girl’s father], Abraham Fixsler, told the New York Post. Fixsler, who holds American and Israeli citizenship and is a legal resident of England, said he was encouraged by doctors abroad, who said there may yet be superior treatment options not available to England’s price-conscious socialized healthcare system. The family is currently awaiting a hearing to determine if England’s highest court will hear their case. No date for the hearing has been set.

Senators Charles Schumer, Cory Booker, and Robert Mendendez—along with ten Republican senators and the former president Israeli president Reuven Rivlin—have all attempted to help the Fixslers.

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Read more at New York Post

More about: Euthanasia, Hasidim, Medicine, Socialism, United Kingdom

Saudi Diplomacy Won’t Bring Peace to Yemen

March 29 2023

Last Sunday marked the eighth anniversary of a Saudi-led alliance’s intervention in the Yemeni civil war, intended to defeat the Iran-backed Houthi militia that had overthrown the previous government. In the wake of the rapprochement between Riyadh and Tehran, diplomats are hoping that the talks between the Saudis and the Houthis—which have been ongoing since last summer—will finally succeed in ending the war. To Nadwa Al-Dawsari, such an outcome seems highly unlikely:

The Houthis’ military gains have allowed them to dictate the path of international diplomacy in Yemen. They know Saudi Arabia is desperate to extricate itself and the international community wants the Yemen problem to go away. They do not recognize and refuse to negotiate with the [Riyadh-supported] Presidential Leadership Council or other Yemeni factions that they cast as “Saudi mercenaries.”

Indeed, even as the Houthis were making progress in talks with the Saudis, the rebel group continued to expand its recruitment, mobilization, and stockpiling of arms during last year’s truce as Iran significantly increased its weapons shipments. The group also carried out a series of attacks. . . . On March 23, the Houthis conducted a military drill close to the Saudi border to remind the Saudis of “the cost of no agreement and further concessions.”

The Houthis are still part and parcel of Iran’s so-called “axis of resistance.” With the Houthis gaining international political recognition, . . . Iran will have a greater chance to expand its influence in Yemen with the blessing of Western powers. The international community is eager for a “success story” in Yemen, even if that means a sham political settlement that will likely see the civil war continue. A deal with the Houthis is Saudi Arabia’s desperate plea to wash its hands of Yemen, but in the long term it could very well position Iran to threaten regional and international security. More importantly, it might set Yemen on a course of protracted conflict that will create vast ungoverned spaces.

Meanwhile, tensions in Yemen between Saudi Arabia and its ostensible ally, the United Arab Emirates, are rising, while the Houthis are developing the capability to launch missiles at Israel or to block a crucial Middle Eastern maritime chokepoint in the Red Sea.

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Read more at Middle East Institute

More about: Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen