Tensions between the U.S. and Turkey Involve Far More than Erdogan’s Behavior

Last week a diplomatic crisis came to a head as the Turkish government revoked the credentials of the American ambassador. Most observers have attributed the spat to the deterioration of once-friendly relations between the two countries as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has moved his country in an undemocratic, pro-Islamist, and anti-Western direction. Yet Steven A. Cook argues that the friction ultimately stems from the fundamental divergence of American and Turkish interests as, with the end of the cold war, the two countries lost the shared antagonism to the Soviet Union that had long held them together:

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Read more at Foreign Policy

More about: Cold War, Hamas, ISIS, Politics & Current Affairs, Turkey, U.S. Foreign policy

The Israel-Sudan Deal Is a Blow to Both Hamas and Iran

While peace between Jerusalem and Khartoum is unlikely to bring the mutual economic benefits that accompany the deals with Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates, it offers much else to the Jewish state. Yoav Limor explains:

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Read more at Israel Hayom

More about: Hamas, Iran, Israel diplomacy, Israeli Security, Sudan