Why Iranians Are in the Streets While Saudis Are—For Now—Content

Saudi Arabia is, if anything, less democratic than Iran. Its citizens have limited rights, and, like the Islamic Republic, its religiously conservative government imposes many restraints on its populace. So why, asks Elliott Abrams, are Iranians demonstrating against their rulers en masse while Saudis seem unperturbed by the status quo?

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Read more at Weekly Standard

More about: Arab Spring, Democracy, Hassan Rouhani, Iran, Politics & Current Affairs, Saudi Arabia

The U.S. Peace Plan May Finally Bring about a Palestinian State

Among those most fervently opposed to Israel applying its sovereignty to Jewish areas of the West Bank are members of the hard right, many of whom live in the affected areas. They do so because, under the Trump administration proposal, the extension of sovereignty makes possible the creation of a Palestinian state in the remainder of the territory. Haviv Rettig Gur comments on this irony:

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Read more at Times of Israel

More about: Annexation, Israel & Zionism