When Iran Attacks in the “Gray Zone,” the U.S. Should Respond in Kind

Sept. 20 2019

Since its war with Iraq ended, writes Michael Eisenstadt, the Islamic Republic has taken to operating in a “gray zone” between war and peace, using proxy militias, terrorist groups, and plausibly deniable attacks to achieve its goals without open warfare. Taking the recent attack on Saudi Arabia as an example of this strategy, Eisenstadt urges the U.S. to retaliate by giving Tehran a taste of its own medicine:

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Read more at Washington Institute for Near East Policy

More about: Iran, Saudi Arabia, U.S. Foreign policy

The Current Negotiations Won’t Stop Iran from Getting Nuclear Weapons

While the Biden White House is committed to restoring the 2015 agreement to restrain the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program, Tehran’s behavior since the deal was concluded should be sufficient to demonstrate that it had no intention of keeping to its terms, argues Elliott Abrams:

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Read more at Pressure Points

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, Joseph Biden, U.S. Foreign policy