The Dangers of Ignoring Anti-Semitism

Surveying recent physical and political assaults on Jews from across Europe and America, Bari Weiss notes a perhaps even more disturbing tendency to ignore or downplay them: from the media’s indifference to violence against the ultra-Orthodox, to a French court dropping charges against an anti-Semitic murderer, to the invective directed at Jews with the temerity to criticize Jeremy Corbyn’s hostility toward them. And often the desire to turn a blind eye to anti-Semitism comes from those who consider themselves greatly sensitive to every other kind of bigotry:

If hatred of Jews can be justified as a misunderstanding or ignored as a mistake or played down as a slip of the tongue or waved away as “just anti-Zionism,” you can all but guarantee it will be.

Jordyn Wright is a Jewish sophomore who sits on the board of the Students’ Society of McGill University. Over winter break, she is planning, like hundreds of other North American Jewish college students, to go to Israel [in a trip organized by her campus’s] Hillel society. As a result of that trip, the student government voted to call for her resignation. . . . Never mind that another student-government leader is also going; apparently because that student is not a Jew, no resignation was required.

Jew-hatred is surging and yet . . . does not command attention or inspire popular outrage. Unless Jews are murdered by neo-Nazis, the one group everyone of conscience recognizes as evil, Jews’ inconvenient murders, their beatings, discrimination against them, the singling out of their state for demonization will be explained away.

When you look at each of these incidents, perhaps it is possible still to pretend that they are random bursts of bigotry perpetrated by hooligans lacking any real organization or power behind them. But Jeremy Corbyn’s electoral prospects in Britain tell a different, far more distressing story—that a person with some of the same impulses as those hooligans can stand within spitting distance of the office of prime minister.

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Read more at New York Times

More about: Anti-Semitism, Anti-Zionism, Jeremy Corbyn

Distrust of the Supreme Court Led Likud Voters to Rally around Netanyahu

Jan. 17 2020

A few weeks ago, Benjamin Netanyahu handily won the Likud party’s primary election, receiving 72 percent of the votes. He won despite the fact that he is facing indictments on corruption charges that could interfere with his ability to govern if he remains Israel’s premier, and despite the credible challenge mounted by his opponent, Gideon Sa’ar. Evelyn Gordon credits the results not to love of Netanyahu but to resentment of Israel’s overweening Supreme Court:

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Read more at Evelyn Gordon

More about: Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli politics, Israeli Supreme Court