What Rulers and Politicians Won’t Learn from the Holocaust Commemoration Ceremony in Jerusalem

Yesterday, an impressive roster of world leaders visited Yad Vashem in Jerusalem to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz. Some—including Prince Charles, Emanuel Macron, and Vladimir Putin—will also be stopping in Ramallah to meet with the Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas, an unrepentant Holocaust denier. For Lyn Julius, this is evidence enough that many of the attendees will return to their homes having learned the wrong lessons:

There is a danger that [these] leaders will come away with confirmation of the idea that anti-Semitism was a purely European phenomenon. Israel is “Europe’s penance” for killing six-million European Jews. The world’s leaders will visit Ramallah with little inkling of the depth of pro-Nazi feeling among Arabs during World War II.

The Palestinian leadership will take care not to mention that one of the foremost Arab leaders, the wartime mufti of Jerusalem, Haj Amin al-Husseini, was complicit with the Nazis. After the Palestinian mufti incited the 1941 farhud massacre of Iraq’s Jews, he spent the rest of the war in Berlin as Hitler’s guest. While pumping out vicious anti-Jewish radio propaganda to the Arab world, he sought Hitler’s permission to manage the extermination of the Jews across the Middle East and North Africa—not just in Palestine—should the Nazis win the war.

When the war ended, the Allies did not put Husseini on trial at Nuremberg. As a result, the Arab world was never “de-Nazified.” Its legacy of anti-Semitic, Nazi-inspired Islamofascism and Islamist terrorism—represented by the Muslim Brotherhood, Islamic State, al-Qaeda, and Hamas—also fuels jihadist anti-Semitism in the West today.

Will anyone at Yad Vashem make the point that 850,000 Jews were forced to flee Arab lands because Arab League states implemented anti-Jewish laws eerily reminiscent of Nuremberg laws against their Jewish citizens, stripping them of their rights and dispossessing them of their property?

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Read more at Harry’s Place

More about: Amin Haj al-Husseini, Arab anti-Semitism, Holocaust, Mahmoud Abbas, Yad Vashem

 

As Vladimir Putin Sidles Up to the Mullahs, the Threat to the U.S. and Israel Grows

On Tuesday, Russia launched an Iranian surveillance satellite into space, which the Islamic Republic will undoubtedly use to increase the precision of its military operations against its enemies. The launch is one of many indications that the longstanding alliance between Moscow and Tehran has been growing stronger and deeper since the Kremlin’s escalation in Ukraine in February. Nicholas Carl, Kitaneh Fitzpatrick, and Katherine Lawlor write:

Presidents Vladimir Putin and Ebrahim Raisi have spoken at least four times since the invasion began—more than either individual has engaged most other world leaders. Putin visited Tehran in July 2022, marking his first foreign travel outside the territory of the former Soviet Union since the war began. These interactions reflect a deepening and potentially more balanced relationship wherein Russia is no longer the dominant party. This partnership will likely challenge U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe.

Tehran has traditionally sought to purchase military technologies from Moscow rather than the inverse. The Kremlin fielding Iranian drones in Ukraine will showcase these platforms to other potential international buyers, further benefitting Iran. Furthermore, Russia has previously tried to limit Iranian influence in Syria but is now enabling its expansion.

Deepening Russo-Iranian ties will almost certainly threaten U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe. Iranian material support to Russia may help the Kremlin achieve some of its military objectives in Ukraine and eastern Europe. Russian support of Iran’s nascent military space program and air force could improve Iranian targeting and increase the threat it poses to the U.S. and its partners in the Middle East. Growing Iranian control and influence in Syria will enable the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps [to use its forces in that country] to threaten U.S. military bases in the Middle East and our regional partners, such as Israel and Turkey, more effectively. Finally, Moscow and Tehran will likely leverage their deepening economic ties to mitigate U.S. sanctions.

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Read more at Critical Threats

More about: Iran, Israeli Security, Russia, U.S. Security, Vladimir Putin