Inside the Organization That Fancies Itself the Voice of the “Jewish Resistance”

Founded in 2012 through the merger of two other far-left American Jewish organizations, Bend the Arc campaigns for progressive political causes by organizing protests and demonstrations, lobbying public officials, and training activists. Sean Cooper, in a detailed report on the organization’s structure and history, explains:

Headquartered in Manhattan with a staff of 70 employees in satellite offices in California and Washington, DC, as well as staffers managing a mix of volunteer and part-time organizers in cities around the country, Bend the Arc provides a national infrastructure whose primary function is to activate mass protest groups that march and demonstrate with Bend the Arc banners, slogans, and clearly defined political positions, . . . making them the “Jewish section” of a national [progressive] movement.

In doing so, the group has managed to establish a high profile, providing quotes, interviews, and soundbites for journalists, making sure its activists appear in press photos—often bearing the accoutrements of Jewish ritual—winning praise from left-leaning politicians, and bringing its messages to synagogues and local Jewish organizations. Then there is question of its funding:

[According] to Bend the Arc’s own financial filings, almost none of its annual revenue is generated from within the Jewish community itself. Rather, its financial backing comes from a small cohort of foundations and wealthy patrons—some of whom otherwise have no active philanthropic role in American Jewry and in some cases seem actively hostile to key points of collective American Jewish identification and interest.

From 2005 to 2013, Bend the Arc received annual donations totaling $1.5 million from the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, for whom support of a Jewish organization is unusual. A review of the $20.3 million [the Rockefeller Brothers] spent on domestic programs in 2013 . . . found that, while active in its support with hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations to Asian, black, and other minority community groups, it provided funding to no other Jewish organization.

What, then, has made Bend the Arc such a singular and attractive investment worth tens of millions of dollars for elite philanthropists who, according to their own financial records, are otherwise unengaged with the well-being of American Jewry? A close look at Bend the Arc’s work over the years would suggest that such an investment was designed not to advance American Jewish life, but rather, to obtain and to cement Jewish-branded support for progressive political causes.

While Bend the Arc itself generally stays away from Israel-related issues, Cooper notes that it has close ties with the anti-Israel group IfNotNow, and that the Rockefeller fund has been a major supporter of the boycott, divest, and sanction (BDS) movement.

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Read more at Tablet

More about: American Jewry, BDS, Progressivism

Will America Invite Israel to Join Its Multinational Coalitions?

From the Korean War onward, the U.S. has rarely fought wars alone, but has instead led coalitions of various allied states. Israel stands out in that it has close military and diplomatic relations with Washington yet its forces have never been part of these coalitions—even in the 1991 Gulf War, when Iraqi missiles were raining down on its cities. The primary reason for its exclusion was the sensitivity of participating Arab and Muslim nations. But now that Jerusalem has diplomatic relations with several Arab countries and indeed regularly participates alongside them in U.S.-led joint military exercises, David Levy believes it may someday soon be asked to contribute to an American expedition.

It is unlikely that Israel would be expected by the U.S. to deploy the Golani [infantry] brigade or any other major army unit. Instead, Washington will likely solicit areas of IDF niche expertise. These include missile defense and special forces, two areas in which Israel is a world leader. The IDF has capabilities that it can share by providing trainers and observers. Naval and air support would also be expected as these assets are inherently deployable. Israel can also provide allies in foreign wars with intelligence and cyber-warfare support, much of which can be accomplished without the physical deployment of troops.

Jerusalem’s previous reasons for abstention from coalitions were legitimate. Since its independence, Israel has faced existential threats. Conventional Arab armies sought to eliminate the nascent state in 1948-49, 1967, and again in 1973. This danger remained ever-present until the 1978 signing of the Camp David Accords, which established peace between Egypt and Israel. Post-Camp David, the threats to Israel remain serious but are no longer existential. If Iran were to become a nuclear power, this would pose a new existential threat. Until then, Israel is relatively well secured.

Jerusalem’s new Arab allies would welcome its aid. Western capitals, especially Washington, should be expected to pursue Israel’s military assistance, and Jerusalem will have little choice but to acquiesce to the expeditionary expectation.

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Read more at BESA Center

More about: IDF, U.S. military, U.S.-Israel relationship