A Fashion Magazine Goes All in for Anti-Semites

Such periodicals as Vogue, which once focused mostly on style, celebrity gossip, dating advice, and movie reviews, have in recent years waded into politics—especially of the left-wing variety. But the British version of the glossy magazine seems to have a particular fondness for anti-Semitic political activists, as Karen Bekker notes:

British Vogue, . . . which claims over 800,000 print readers and 3.2 million unique monthly online visitors, has put what it calls “an inspiring army of activists” on the cover of its September issue (arguably the most important issue of the year). Among the twenty activists the magazine chose to feature are Tamika Mallory and Angela Davis. The magazine called Mallory “one of the most vital activists of her generation” in a feature interview, and called Davis a “straight-up legend.”

In January of 2017, Tamika Mallory rose to prominence as one of four main leaders of the Women’s March, one of the largest political marches in U.S. history. It was not long afterwards, however, that news about her connection with Louis Farrakhan, . . . as well as her own anti-Semitic comments, began to slowly trickle out. . . . In April of 2018, she slandered the Antidefamation League as “CONSTANTLY attacking black and brown people.” . . . At the March’s very first leadership meeting, Mallory asserted . . . “that Jews were proven to have been leaders of the American slave trade.” . . . She also later accused “white Jews” of “upholding white supremacy”.

And then there is Angela Davis, an obsessive Israel hater who herself played a role in a 1970 domestic terror attack:

Davis has supported Rasmea Odeh, a member of the terrorist group Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP). Odeh was convicted in Israel for the killing of two Hebrew University students, Edward Joffe and Leon Kanner. . . . The September cover is the third time this year that British Vogue has prominently featured Davis.

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Read more at CAMERA

More about: Anti-Semitism, Louis Farrakhan, Media, PFLP, Women's March

As Vladimir Putin Sidles Up to the Mullahs, the Threat to the U.S. and Israel Grows

On Tuesday, Russia launched an Iranian surveillance satellite into space, which the Islamic Republic will undoubtedly use to increase the precision of its military operations against its enemies. The launch is one of many indications that the longstanding alliance between Moscow and Tehran has been growing stronger and deeper since the Kremlin’s escalation in Ukraine in February. Nicholas Carl, Kitaneh Fitzpatrick, and Katherine Lawlor write:

Presidents Vladimir Putin and Ebrahim Raisi have spoken at least four times since the invasion began—more than either individual has engaged most other world leaders. Putin visited Tehran in July 2022, marking his first foreign travel outside the territory of the former Soviet Union since the war began. These interactions reflect a deepening and potentially more balanced relationship wherein Russia is no longer the dominant party. This partnership will likely challenge U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe.

Tehran has traditionally sought to purchase military technologies from Moscow rather than the inverse. The Kremlin fielding Iranian drones in Ukraine will showcase these platforms to other potential international buyers, further benefitting Iran. Furthermore, Russia has previously tried to limit Iranian influence in Syria but is now enabling its expansion.

Deepening Russo-Iranian ties will almost certainly threaten U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe. Iranian material support to Russia may help the Kremlin achieve some of its military objectives in Ukraine and eastern Europe. Russian support of Iran’s nascent military space program and air force could improve Iranian targeting and increase the threat it poses to the U.S. and its partners in the Middle East. Growing Iranian control and influence in Syria will enable the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps [to use its forces in that country] to threaten U.S. military bases in the Middle East and our regional partners, such as Israel and Turkey, more effectively. Finally, Moscow and Tehran will likely leverage their deepening economic ties to mitigate U.S. sanctions.

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Read more at Critical Threats

More about: Iran, Israeli Security, Russia, U.S. Security, Vladimir Putin