The Red-Green Alliance Comes to America

Oct. 14 2020

Regardless of who wins the upcoming presidential election, writes Ed Husain, a segment of the American left that has made common cause with radical Islam is likely to gain more influence in the Democratic party. This unlikely alliance is exemplified by Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar, who comprise half of the “Squad”—a group of young congresswomen who represent the new face of the Democrats’ left flank.

This intersection has put aside their deep divergences on God, religion, family, homosexuality, and the role of women and united their activist base on campuses and community hubs in their shared hatred for Western history and capitalism. This counterintuitive union, which I have called the “Red-Green Alliance,” is similar to the revolutionary mindset that saw Iranian left-Islamists come together before 1979 with the encouragement of the French philosopher Michel Foucault. In Britain, Jeremy Corbyn, the former Labor party leader, had a similar Red-Green alliance last year with a view to winning the general election with 30 Muslim-influenced constituencies—only to lose disastrously.

But when push comes to shove, Islamism and “wokeness” do not mix. Iran’s Islamists killed thousands and exiled leftists. In Gaza, Hamas hanged leftists from tall buildings. Ask Egyptian feminists how the Islamists in Egypt treated them after the 2011 uprisings. Islamists debated in Parliament to reduce the age of consent for marriage for women from eighteen to nine.

[Moreover], the Red-Green Alliance wants to tear down the alliances of safety and stability that America and the West have supported in the Middle East. Omar has repeatedly attacked Egypt and the Gulf states. Yet the real risks of a Muslim Brotherhood-led, sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic government in Libya or Sudan have not seemed to trouble her and her allies.

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Read more at The National

More about: Democrats, Ilhan Omar, Jeremy Corbyn, Radical Islam, Rashida Tlaib, U.S. Politics

 

Why the Leader of Hamas Went to Russia

Sept. 30 2022

Earlier this month, the Hamas chairman Ismail Haniyeh and several of his colleagues visited Moscow, where they met with Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and other Russian officials. According to Arabic-language media, Haniyeh came seeking “new ideas” about how to wage war against the Jewish state. The terrorist group has had good relations with the Kremlin for several years, and even maintains an office in Moscow. John Hardie and Ivana Stradner comment on the timing of the visit:

For Moscow, the visit likely reflects a continuation of its efforts to leverage the Palestinians and other issues to pressure Israel over its stance on Russia’s war in Ukraine. Russia and Israel built friendly relations in the decades following the Soviet Union’s dissolution. After Russia invaded Ukraine in February, Jerusalem condemned the war, but made sure to tread carefully in order to preserve working ties with Moscow, lest Russian military forces in Syria disrupt Israel’s strategically important air operations there.

Nevertheless, bilateral tensions spiked in April after Yair Lapid, then serving as Israel’s foreign minister, joined the chorus of voices worldwide accusing Russia of committing war crimes in Ukraine. Jerusalem later provided Kyiv with some non-lethal military aid and a field hospital. In response, Moscow hardened its rhetoric about Israeli actions in the Palestinian territories.

The Palestinian issue isn’t the only way that Russia has sought to pressure Israel. Moscow is also threatening, on seemingly spurious grounds, to shutter the Russian branch of the Jewish Agency.

Moscow likely has little appetite for outright conflict with Israel, particularly when the bulk of Russia’s military is floundering in Ukraine. But there are plenty of other ways that Russia, which maintains an active intelligence presence in the Jewish state, could damage Israel’s interests. As Moscow cozies up with Hamas, Iran, and other enemies of Israel, Jerusalem—and its American allies—would do well to keep a watchful eye.

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Read more at Algemeiner

More about: Hamas, Israeli Security, Russia