The West Must Punish the Countries Inciting Terror in Europe

On October 22, a French-Chechen Muslim beheaded a schoolteacher in a Paris suburb for showing cartoons of Mohammad. Since then, there have been several other acts of terror in France. (It is not yet clear, as of this writing, whether last night’s murderous attack near a Vienna synagogue is related.) Meanwhile, Islamist leaders around the world have responded with further incitement. Jonathan Michanie urges the West to stand firm:

Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan claimed that Emmanuel Macron’s [condemnation of Islamic extremism is] comparable to [the behavior] of the Nazi party during the 1930s and to the propaganda preceding the 1995 massacre of Bosnian Muslims in Srebrenica. Putting their geopolitical disputes aside, Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei tweeted in solidarity: “Why is it a crime to raise doubts about the Holocaust? Why should anyone who writes about such doubts be imprisoned while insulting the Prophet (pbuh) is allowed?” It should be noted that neither of these leaders condemned the brutal murder of [the schoolteacher]—condoning and excusing terrorism is nothing out of the ordinary for these regimes.

Similar condemnations of the French government were made by the Pakistani prime minister Imran Khan, . . . and on October 29, Malaysia’s ex-prime minister claimed that “Muslims have a right to kill millions of French people,” [even if they have demonstrated admirable restraint in not exercising this right].

[Such] rhetoric is not just an assault on Western values, but [also] serves as ammunition for the atrocious human-rights violations that are being carried out by these extremist regimes.

[I]mmediate and harsh targeted sanctions need to be placed on Iranian, Turkish, and Pakistani officials. Every antagonizing action by these radical regimes will not only perpetuate the human-rights abuses they are carrying out but will weaken the West’s ability to deter the rising aggression by Islamic authoritarian regimes. Silence and complacency are not an option.

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Read more at National Interest

More about: Emmanuel Macron, European Islam, Iran, Pakistan, Radical Islam, Turkey

 

How European Fecklessness Encourages the Islamic Republic’s Assassination Campaign

In September, Cypriot police narrowly foiled a plot by an Iranian agent to murder five Jewish businessman. This was but one of roughly a dozen similar operations that Tehran has conducted in Europe since 2015—on both Israeli or Jewish and American targets—which have left three dead. Matthew Karnitschnig traces the use of assassination as a strategic tool to the very beginning of the Islamic Republic, and explains its appeal:

In the West, assassination remains a last resort (think Osama bin Laden); in authoritarian states, it’s the first (who can forget the 2017 assassination by nerve agent of Kim Jong-nam, the playboy half-brother of North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un, upon his arrival in Kuala Lumpur?). For rogue states, even if the murder plots are thwarted, the regimes still win by instilling fear in their enemies’ hearts and minds. That helps explain the recent frequency. Over the course of a few months last year, Iran undertook a flurry of attacks from Latin America to Africa.

Whether such operations succeed or not, the countries behind them can be sure of one thing: they won’t be made to pay for trying. Over the years, the Russian and Iranian regimes have eliminated countless dissidents, traitors, and assorted other enemies (real and perceived) on the streets of Paris, Berlin, and even Washington, often in broad daylight. Others have been quietly abducted and sent home, where they faced sham trials and were then hanged for treason.

While there’s no shortage of criticism in the West in the wake of these crimes, there are rarely real consequences. That’s especially true in Europe, where leaders have looked the other way in the face of a variety of abuses in the hopes of reviving a deal to rein in Tehran’s nuclear-weapons program and renewing business ties.

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Read more at Politico

More about: Europe, Iran, Israeli Security, Terrorism