Relearning Religious Tolerance Requires Restoring the Constitutional Order

Dec. 21 2020

In the past few years, the Supreme Court has seen a flurry of rulings on issues of religious freedom, concerning whether religious schools can receive federal funds, whether bakers can decline to design cakes for gay weddings, whether a Catholic adoption agency can insist on only placing children with heterosexual couples, and most recently whether states can restrict attendance at houses of worship to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Underlying all these cases, writes Adam White, is a conflict between two opposing views of religious tolerance. One was summed up by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in her final dissent, in the case of the Little Sisters of the Poor—a group of nuns who wished to avoid paying for their employees’ contraception:

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Read more at Commentary

More about: Freedom of Religion, James Madison, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, U.S. Constitution

 

Iran’s Elections Could Complicate U.S. Plans to Renew the Nuclear Deal

June 11 2021

This week, after the International Atomic Energy Agency announced its suspicions that the Islamic Republic is hiding nuclear materials from its inspectors, the White House decided to lift some sanctions on Iranian oil, and still plans to forge ahead with nuclear negotiations. Meanwhile, Iran will hold its presidential elections next week. The exercise is not particularly democratic—the supreme leader approves the candidates in advance, and his minions have from time to time fixed the results—but neither is it entirely meaningless. While there are important differences among the candidates, not one can be dubbed a moderate, even by the standards of this brutal Islamist theocracy. Reuel Marc Gerecht explains why this matters:

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Read more at Dispatch

More about: Ali Khamenei, Barack Obama, Iran nuclear program, Joseph Biden