In Reconsidering a 1977 Ruling, the Supreme Court Might Greatly Expand Protections for Sabbath Observers

Over 40 years ago, Larry Hardison—a member of a church that observes the Sabbath on Saturday—lost his job at the now-defunct Trans World Airlines for refusing to work on his holy day. When Hardison challenged his firing in court, the airline argued that it should not be required to allow Harden to trade his shift with another worker, who by reason of seniority would receive greater pay. The Supreme Court at the time sided with the airline. At issue was a 1972 amendment to the Civil Rights Act, requiring employers to provide “reasonable accommodation” for an employee’s “religious observance and practice,” so long as doing so does not involve “undue hardship.” The American Jewish lawyer Nathan Lewin, who helped to argue Hardison’s case before the Supreme Court, outlines the question at hand:

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Read more at JNS

More about: American law, Freedom of Religion, Sabbath, Supreme Court

Iran’s Elections Could Complicate U.S. Plans to Renew the Nuclear Deal

June 11 2021

This week, after the International Atomic Energy Agency announced its suspicions that the Islamic Republic is hiding nuclear materials from its inspectors, the White House decided to lift some sanctions on Iranian oil, and still plans to forge ahead with nuclear negotiations. Meanwhile, Iran will hold its presidential elections next week. The exercise is not particularly democratic—the supreme leader approves the candidates in advance, and his minions have from time to time fixed the results—but neither is it entirely meaningless. While there are important differences among the candidates, not one can be dubbed a moderate, even by the standards of this brutal Islamist theocracy. Reuel Marc Gerecht explains why this matters:

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Read more at Dispatch

More about: Ali Khamenei, Barack Obama, Iran nuclear program, Joseph Biden