Ilhan Omar’s Anti-Semitism Tap-Dance Is Deliberate

In a recent interview on CNN, Ilhan Omar was asked about her statement a few weeks ago equating Israel and the U.S. with Hamas and the Taliban—a statement that she had already walked back. She replied that she had no regrets about her original remarks, and then went on to say the Jewish Democratic congressmen who have criticized her anti-Semitism and hatred of Israel “haven’t been partners in justice.” The editors of the Washington Free Beacon write:

Omar, as the kids say, is owning her truth. Her tap dance follows a pattern that is by now well established, in which the [self-described] “justice-seeking” congresswoman makes nakedly prejudicial remarks, pretends to walk them back in the face of muted criticism from her colleagues, characterizes the criticism itself as Islamophobic, and proceeds to reoffend.

That pattern gives the lie to the apology Omar issued after arguing that American support for Israel is “all about the Benjamins, baby,” [Benjamins being slang for hundred-dollar bills]. Her offenses were born of ignorance rather than prejudice, she said, and thanked her colleagues for “educating me on the painful history of anti-Semitic tropes.”

Omar could give a master class on anti-Semitism, and the pattern of her offenses makes clear she is using that knowledge to perpetuate it. That’s probably why a . . . report earlier this month indicated that “a number of Omar’s fellow Democrats believe Omar is an anti-Semite, even if they don’t say so publicly.” It is, of course, the only prejudice about which Democrats are tight-lipped and the only one tolerated in the party’s ranks.

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Read more at Washington Free Beacon

More about: anti-Americanism, Anti-Semitism, Democrats, Ilhan Omar, U.S. Politics

 

Don’t Let Iran Go Nuclear

Sept. 29 2022

In an interview on Sunday, National Security Advisor Jake Sullivan stated that the Biden administration remains committed to nuclear negotiations with the Islamic Republic, even as it pursues its brutal crackdown on the protests that have swept the country. Robert Satloff argues not only that it is foolish to pursue the renewal of the 2015 nuclear deal, but also that the White House’s current approach is failing on its own terms:

[The] nuclear threat is much worse today than it was when President Biden took office. Oddly, Washington hasn’t really done much about it. On the diplomatic front, the administration has sweetened its offer to entice Iran into a new nuclear deal. While it quite rightly held firm on Iran’s demand to remove the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps from an official list of “foreign terrorist organizations,” Washington has given ground on many other items.

On the nuclear side of the agreement, the United States has purportedly agreed to allow Iran to keep, in storage, thousands of advanced centrifuges it has made contrary to the terms of the original deal. . . . And on economic matters, the new deal purportedly gives Iran immediate access to a certain amount of blocked assets, before it even exports most of its massive stockpile of enriched uranium for safekeeping in a third country. . . . Even with these added incentives, Iran is still holding out on an agreement. Indeed, according to the most recent reports, Tehran has actually hardened its position.

Regardless of the exact reason why, the menacing reality is that Iran’s nuclear program is galloping ahead—and the United States is doing very little about it. . . . The result has been a stunning passivity in U.S. policy toward the Iran nuclear issue.

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Read more at Washington Institute for Near East Policy

More about: Iran nuclear deal, Joseph Biden, U.S. Foreign policy