Left-Wing Critics of Israel Are Using the Language of David Duke and the Hitler Youth

Earlier this year, the Israeli organization B’tselem issued a report accusing the Jewish state of implementing “a regime of Jewish supremacy.” The same phrase has appeared recently in a condemnation of Israel written by a group of Jewish-studies professors, an op-ed in a Connecticut news outlet, and a report from a scholar at the prestigious Brookings institution. Gil Troy notes the history of this ugly locution:

Jew-haters [have been obsessed by] Jewish “power,” as Jews endured centuries of powerlessness and persecution. . . . Nazis justified their mass murder of Jews by escalating the canard about Jews controlling the world into a struggle against “Jewish supremacy.”

In Mein Kampf, Adolf Hitler warned Germans against “the movement for expanding Jewish power on a wider scale and finally subjugating the world to its rule.” . . . The Nazi propaganda rag Der Stürmer railed against “Jewish mastery,” while Washington’s Holocaust Museum houses a photograph of a Hitler Youth proclamation that “Adolf Hitler bricht mit seiner Bewegung die jüdische Vorherrschaft,” [meaning], “Hitler breaks Jewish supremacy with his movement.”

In 2003, on his way to becoming America’s leading white supremacist, David Duke also adopted this theme. In Jewish Supremacism: My Awakening to the Jewish Question, Duke describes his maturation as an adult who started wondering: “What was it . . . about the Jewish people that inspired such hate” over millennia? After dishonestly cherry-picking certain biblical and talmudic selections, he blamed “Jewish supremacism”—which he defined as “Jewish chauvinism, suspicion, and anger against Gentiles.”

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Read more at Newsweek

More about: Adolf Hitler, Anti-Semitism, David Duke

Reforms to Israel’s Judiciary Must Be Carefully Calibrated

The central topic of debate in Israel now is the new coalition government’s proposed reforms of the nation’s judiciary and unwritten constitution. Peter Berkowitz agrees that reform is necessary, but that “the proper scope and pace of reform, however, are open to debate and must be carefully calibrated.”

In particular, Berkowitz argues,

to preserve political cohesiveness, substantial changes to the structure of the Israeli regime must earn support that extends beyond these partisan divisions.

In a deft analysis of the conservative spirit in Israel, bestselling author Micah Goodman warns in the Hebrew language newspaper Makor Rishon that unintended consequences flowing from the constitutional counterrevolution are likely to intensify political instability. When a center-left coalition returns to power, Goodman points out, it may well repeal through a simple majority vote the major changes Netanyahu’s right-wing coalition seeks to enact. Or it may use the legislature’s expanded powers, say, to ram through laws that impair the religious liberty of the ultra-Orthodox. Either way, in a torn nation, constitutional counterrevolution amplifies division.

Conservatives make a compelling case that balance must be restored to the separation of powers in Israel. A prudent concern for the need to harmonize Israel’s free, democratic, and Jewish character counsels deliberation in the pursuit of necessary constitutional reform.

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Read more at RealClearPolitics

More about: Israel & Zionism, Israeli Judicial Reform