The Activists Who Raise Havoc over the Cultural Appropriation of a Taco Ignore or Justify Anti-Semitic Violence

According to a recently released survey of Jewish college students, 70 percent of those queried said they had experience anti-Semitism, and 50 percent reported having hid their identity to protect themselves from harassment. Bari Weiss sees in these results evidence of rapidly growing hostility toward Jews in America:

My own inbox is a microcosm of this acceleration: I used to receive a note every other week of a story that deserved to be told. Now I sometimes get word of several in a single day. Some of those stories have made headlines. The machete attack at a rabbi’s home in upstate New York during Hanukkah. The attack outside a sushi restaurant in West Hollywood during the recent war between Hamas and Israel. [The rapper and record producer] P. Diddy hosting Louis Farrakhan on Revolt TV for an Independence Day address last July.

But you probably missed the story of Rose Ritch, a young Jewish woman who was hounded out of her role as a student vice-president at the University of Southern California. “Impeach her Zionist ass,” her fellow students proclaimed, echoing Communist-party apparatchiks of another time. Or the book, published by Hachette, called In Defense of Looting, in which the author argues that Jews and Koreans are “the face of capital.” . . . Or the swastikas drawn on schools in Georgia in the days just before this Yom Kippur.

In . . . an era in which the past is mined by offense-archaeologists for the most minor of “microaggressions,” the very real “macroaggressions” taking place right now against Jews go ignored. Assaults on ḥasidic Jews on the streets of Brooklyn, which have become a regular feature of life there, are overlooked or, sometimes, justified by the very activists who go to the mat over the “cultural appropriation” of a taco. It is why corporations issue passionate press releases and pledge tens of millions of dollars to other minorities when they are under siege, but almost never do the same for Jews.

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Read more at Common Sense

More about: American Jewry, American politics, Anti-Semitism, Political correctness

As Vladimir Putin Sidles Up to the Mullahs, the Threat to the U.S. and Israel Grows

On Tuesday, Russia launched an Iranian surveillance satellite into space, which the Islamic Republic will undoubtedly use to increase the precision of its military operations against its enemies. The launch is one of many indications that the longstanding alliance between Moscow and Tehran has been growing stronger and deeper since the Kremlin’s escalation in Ukraine in February. Nicholas Carl, Kitaneh Fitzpatrick, and Katherine Lawlor write:

Presidents Vladimir Putin and Ebrahim Raisi have spoken at least four times since the invasion began—more than either individual has engaged most other world leaders. Putin visited Tehran in July 2022, marking his first foreign travel outside the territory of the former Soviet Union since the war began. These interactions reflect a deepening and potentially more balanced relationship wherein Russia is no longer the dominant party. This partnership will likely challenge U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe.

Tehran has traditionally sought to purchase military technologies from Moscow rather than the inverse. The Kremlin fielding Iranian drones in Ukraine will showcase these platforms to other potential international buyers, further benefitting Iran. Furthermore, Russia has previously tried to limit Iranian influence in Syria but is now enabling its expansion.

Deepening Russo-Iranian ties will almost certainly threaten U.S. and allied interests in Europe, the Middle East, and around the globe. Iranian material support to Russia may help the Kremlin achieve some of its military objectives in Ukraine and eastern Europe. Russian support of Iran’s nascent military space program and air force could improve Iranian targeting and increase the threat it poses to the U.S. and its partners in the Middle East. Growing Iranian control and influence in Syria will enable the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps [to use its forces in that country] to threaten U.S. military bases in the Middle East and our regional partners, such as Israel and Turkey, more effectively. Finally, Moscow and Tehran will likely leverage their deepening economic ties to mitigate U.S. sanctions.

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Read more at Critical Threats

More about: Iran, Israeli Security, Russia, U.S. Security, Vladimir Putin