Ukraine May Finally Be Coming to Terms with Its Jewish Past

Oct. 27 2021

From the 17th century onward, Ukraine—first as part of Poland, then as part of Russia—had one of the world’s largest Jewish populations, peaking at 2.7 million on the eve of the Holocaust, and remaining around 250,000 even after the collapse of the Soviet Union. It is also a country whose national movement has been inextricably tied up with anti-Semitism, and none of the past four centuries has gone by without vicious outbreaks of anti-Jewish violence. Yet things seem at last to be changing, writes David Lepeska:

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Read more at Newlines

More about: Anti-Semitism, Holocaust, Jewish history, Ukrainian Jews, War in Ukraine

“I Had the Good Fortune to Be a Jew Born and Raised in the USA”

Nov. 26 2021

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died on Friday at the age of eighty-seven. Among much else, Ginsburg was one of the most prominent Jews in American public life. Herewith, her remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in 2004 on the occasion of Yom Hashoah:

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: American Jewry, Supreme Court, Theodor Herzl, Yom Hashoah