Americans Should Be Thankful for the Gift That Is Our Country, and Its Legacy of Freedom

Nov. 24 2021

Upon arising, devout Jews immediately say a short prayer that begins with the words “I thank You, Living and Everlasting God,” and it has often been remarked that the Jews take their name from the biblical Judah—who happens to figure prominently in the upcoming Sabbath’s Torah reading—whose name in turn derives from the word meaning to give thanks. Thus the underlying attitude of the holiday of Thanksgiving is compatible with intrinsically Jewish ones. Yuval Levin, in a 2013 speech, reflected on the political importance of gratitude, and in particular gratitude for “the great gift that is our country.”

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Read more at Ethics and Public Policy Center

More about: Conservatism, Judaism, Thanksgiving, United States

“I Had the Good Fortune to Be a Jew Born and Raised in the USA”

Nov. 26 2021

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died on Friday at the age of eighty-seven. Among much else, Ginsburg was one of the most prominent Jews in American public life. Herewith, her remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in 2004 on the occasion of Yom Hashoah:

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: American Jewry, Supreme Court, Theodor Herzl, Yom Hashoah