In Kuwait’s Schools, Anti-Semitism Is Part of the Curriculum

Dec. 20 2021

After the September 11 attacks, the Kuwaiti minister of education promised to revise the textbooks used in his country’s schools so that they would promote “brotherhood, equality, love, caring, mercifulness, and coexistence.” Two decades later, the textbooks indeed contain such statements as “people are equal in dignity and enjoy equal right to protection under the law without discrimination.” They also contain much invective aimed at Jews, as David Andrew Weinberg writes:

Kuwait’s new ruler, Amir Nawaf al-Sabah, took office in September 2020, and during his biggest speech this year he called on the Kuwaiti nation to practice “adherence to the teachings of our tolerant religion, which urges us to unify ranks and spread kindness and compassion.”

However, according to the Kuwaiti government’s official list of textbooks in use for the new 2021-22 academic year, its Ministry of Education is continuing to reuse state-published textbooks from past years that teach horrific anti-Semitism. In addition, some lessons include ideas that are intolerant or confrontational toward Ahmadi Muslims, Baha’is, and Christians.

The ADL found particularly disturbing examples of anti-Semitic materials in Kuwait’s second-semester textbook in use for eighth-grade public-school courses on Islamic education. Even among the textbook’s stated learning objectives, it declares one objective is for students to learn that “the enmity of the Jews toward Islam and the Muslims is old and deeply rooted” and that “stirring up strife, breaking pacts, and malice are among the inherent characteristics of the Jews.” . . . And it advocates a range of actions to “challenge the conspiracies of the Jews,” including “boycotting their products.”

Looking . . . toward the future, this textbook. . . calls for confronting the Jews by “Muslims’ shouldering the obligation to liberate their lands and holy sites, and to cleanse them from the enemies of God.”

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Read more at ADL

More about: Anti-Semitism, Arab anti-Semitism, Jewish-Muslim Relations, Kuwait

Condemning Terrorism in Jerusalem—and Efforts to Stop It

Jan. 30 2023

On Friday night, a Palestinian opened fire at a group of Israelis standing outside a Jerusalem synagogue, killing seven and wounding several others. The day before, the IDF had been drawn into a gunfight in the West Bank city of Jenin while trying to arrest members of a terrorist cell. Of the nine Palestinians killed in the raid, only one appears to have been a noncombatant. Lahav Harkov compares the responses to the two events, beginning with the more recent:

President Joe Biden called Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to denounce the attack, offer his condolences, and express his commitment to Israel’s security. Other leaders released supportive statements as well. Governments across Europe condemned the attack. Turkey’s foreign ministry did the same, as did Israel’s Abraham Accords partners the UAE and Bahrain. Even Saudi Arabia released a statement against the killing of civilians in Jerusalem.

It feels wrong to criticize those statements. . . . But the condemnations should be full-throated, not spoken out of one side of the mouth while the other is wishy-washy about what it takes to stave off terrorism. These very same leaders and ministries were tsk-tsking at Israel for doing just that only a day before the attacks in Jerusalem.

The context didn’t seem to matter to some countries that are friendly to Israel. It didn’t matter that Israel was trying to stop jihadists from attacking civilians; it didn’t matter that IDF soldiers were attacked on the way.

It’s very easy for some to be sad when Jews are murdered. Yet, at the same time, so many of them are uncomfortable with Jews asserting themselves, protecting themselves, arming themselves against the bloodthirsty horde that would hand out bonbons to celebrate their deaths. It’s a reminder of how important it is that we do just that, and how essential the state of Israel is.

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Read more at Lahav’s Newsletter

More about: Jerusalem, Palestinian terror