Israeli Chipmaker Enters into $5.4 Billion Deal with Intel

Intel Corp is buying Tower Semiconductor, an Israeli company specializing in chipmaking. As reported by Reuters and the Algemeiner, the move comes at an opportune time, “when the global semiconductor shortage has hampered the production of everything from smartphones to cars.” It will also help to restore Intel’s dominance in the field at a moment when the U.S. is highly reliant on Asian chipmakers.

The acquisition will deepen Intel’s presence in a sector dominated by the Taiwan-based TSMC, the world’s largest chipmaker.

“Tower’s specialty technology portfolio (and) geographic reach . . . will help scale Intel’s foundry services and advance our goal of becoming a major provider of foundry capacity globally,” said Intel’s chief executive Pat Gelsinger.

“This deal will enable Intel to offer a compelling breadth of leading-edge nodes and differentiated specialty technologies on mature nodes—unlocking new opportunities for existing and future customers in an era of unprecedented demand for semiconductors,” he said in a statement.

Read more at Algemeiner

More about: Israeli economy, Israeli technology

 

Only Hamas’s Defeat Can Pave the Path to Peace

Opponents of the IDF’s campaign in Gaza often appeal to two related arguments: that Hamas is rooted in a set of ideas and thus cannot be defeated militarily, and that the destruction in Gaza only further radicalizes Palestinians, thus increasing the threat to Israel. Rejecting both lines of thinking, Ghaith al-Omar writes:

What makes Hamas and similar militant organizations effective is not their ideologies but their ability to act on them. For Hamas, the sustained capacity to use violence was key to helping it build political power. Back in the 1990s, Hamas’s popularity was at its lowest point, as most Palestinians believed that liberation could be achieved by peaceful and diplomatic means. Its use of violence derailed that concept, but it established Hamas as a political alternative.

Ever since, the use of force and violence has been an integral part of Hamas’s strategy. . . . Indeed, one lesson from October 7 is that while Hamas maintains its military and violent capabilities, it will remain capable of shaping the political reality. To be defeated, Hamas must be denied that. This can only be done through the use of force.

Any illusions that Palestinian and Israeli societies can now trust one another or even develop a level of coexistence anytime soon should be laid to rest. If it can ever be reached, such an outcome is at best a generational endeavor. . . . Hamas triggered war and still insists that it would do it all again given the chance, so it will be hard-pressed to garner a following from Palestinians in Gaza who suffered so horribly for its decision.

Read more at Washington Institute for Near East Policy

More about: Gaza War 2023, Hamas, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict