Why Protests Are Surging in Iran—and What the Biden Administration Should Do About It

In a recent interview with a Western a journalist, an Iranian dissenter accused Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei of “imposing famine on us” through “useless uranium enrichment, interfering in internal affairs of neighboring countries, stupid enmity with Israel,” and much else. As Behnam Ben Taleblu and Saeed Ghasseminejad document, the ongoing protests in Iran—which the government has brutally been trying to repress—may have been prompted by economic conditions but have become more broadly political. They outline the conditions leading to the current unrest, their proximate causes, and the reasons they are unlikely to end anytime soon—as well as possible steps the U.S. can take to support the dissenters.

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Read more at Dispatch

More about: Iran, Joseph Biden, U.S. Foreign policy

Is American Jewish Liberalism Dying?

June 30 2022

In the 1930s, a Republic Jewish judge, observing his coreligionists’ commitment to the Democratic party, quipped, in Yiddish, that Jews have three velt (worlds): di velt (this world), yene velt (the next world), and Roosevelt. Since then, Jewish devotion has attenuated somewhat, although Jews still overwhelming lean Democratic. Most American Jews, however, are unfamiliar with the terms “this world” or “the next world” in any language. Carefully examining a wealth of statistical data, Samuel J. Abrams and Jack Wertheimer argue that the sort of robust Jewish liberalism that characterized U.S. Jewry a few decades ago is in steep decline. Jews, they explain, are undergoing their own version of what political scientists call the “great sort,” whereby politics, religion, and place of residence increasingly align:

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Read more at Tablet

More about: American Jewish History, American Jewry, Liberalism, U.S. Politics