Jewish Sources Aren’t Just Hashtags for Preconceived Political Attitudes

March 5 2018

To Jeffrey Salkin, the rabbi of a Reform congregation in Florida, too many Jews expect their religious patrimony to contain little more than prooftexts for the progressive political beliefs they already hold. Instead of plumbing the depths of such teachings as “in God’s image,” “Thou shalt love the stranger,” and “Justice, justice, shalt thou pursue” to uncover their meaning, they treat them as mere slogans. Salkin, in conversation with Jonathan Silver, discusses how Judaism—of any denomination—might escape such political reductionism while still sharing its wisdom in the political realm. (Audio, 57 minutes. Options for download and streaming are available at the link below.)

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More about: American Judaism, Judaism, Reform Judaism, Religion & Holidays, Social Justice

Understanding the Background of the White House Ruling on Anti-Semitism and the Civil Rights Act

Dec. 13 2019

On Wednesday, the president signed an executive order allowing federal officials to extend the protections of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act to Jews. (The order, promptly condemned for classifying Jews as a separate nationality, did nothing of the sort.) In 2010, Kenneth Marcus called for precisely such a ruling in the pages of Commentary, citing in particular the Department of Education’s lax response to a series of incidents at the University of California at Irvine, where, among much elase, Jewish property was vandalized and Jewish students were pelted with rocks, called “dirty Jew” and other epithets, and were told, “Jewish students are the plague of mankind.”

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Read more at Commentary

More about: Anti-Semitism, Israel on campus, U.S. Politics