How the Talmud Anticipated Behavioral Economics

In talmudic tort law, remuneration for damages must in many cases be paid in high-quality land. (As in most premodern economies, payment made in kind was more common than payment in cash.) A court thus places a price on the damages and then the responsible party must transfer to the plaintiff an area of his best land of equivalent value—rather than a larger area of lower-quality land. From the standpoint of classical economics, such a requirement is nonsensical, as Shlomo Zuckier writes:

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Read more at Lehrhaus

More about: Economics, Halakhah, Psychology, Religion & Holidays, Talmud

The Israel-Sudan Deal Is a Blow to Both Hamas and Iran

While peace between Jerusalem and Khartoum is unlikely to bring the mutual economic benefits that accompany the deals with Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates, it offers much else to the Jewish state. Yoav Limor explains:

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Read more at Israel Hayom

More about: Hamas, Iran, Israel diplomacy, Israeli Security, Sudan