How the Talmud Anticipated Behavioral Economics

Feb. 18 2019

In talmudic tort law, remuneration for damages must in many cases be paid in high-quality land. (As in most premodern economies, payment made in kind was more common than payment in cash.) A court thus places a price on the damages and then the responsible party must transfer to the plaintiff an area of his best land of equivalent value—rather than a larger area of lower-quality land. From the standpoint of classical economics, such a requirement is nonsensical, as Shlomo Zuckier writes:

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Read more at Lehrhaus

More about: Economics, Halakhah, Psychology, Religion & Holidays, Talmud

Exploring the Political Significance of the Seder Liturgy

April 6 2020

Besides being one of the most beloved of all Jewish texts, argues Meir Soloveichik, the Haggadah is also a foundational work of Jewish political philosophy. He explains why this is so—and much else about this deceptively simple work—in an eight-part audio course. Listen to the first lecture here, and click on the link below for the entire series. (Other options for download and streaming are also available.)

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Read more at Tikvah

More about: Haggadah, Jewish political tradition, Seder