From Playing the Trumpet with Dizzy Gillespie to Blowing an Antelope-Horn Shofar

July 24 2019

The economist Jennie Litvack, who died on June 27 at the age of fifty-five, made important contributions to the study of developing countries. But her two great passions were the trumpet—she had befriended the great jazz trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie when she was fourteen—and Judaism. She also found a way to combine these two passions, as the Economist writes. (Free registration required.)

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Read more at Economist

More about: Binding of Isaac, Judaism, Music, Shofar

Why a Military Conflict between Iran and Israel Seems Inevitable

Jan. 20 2021

Since the year began, the IDF has stepped up its attacks on Iranian positions in Syria, striking more targets and going deeper into Syrian territory than usual. Meanwhile, Tehran has increased its enrichment of uranium, moving ever closer to building nuclear weapons. Efraim Inbar addresses the situation in depth:

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Read more at Jerusalem Institute for Strategy and Security

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, Israeli Security, U.S. Foreign policy