The Terrible Jewish Irony at the Heart of “Chariots of Fire”

The film Chariots of Fire, released 40 years ago this month, tells the story of two real-life British athletes, Harold Abrahams and Eric Liddell, with Olympic aspirations. Abrahams—a Jew—faces often subtle but ever-present anti-Semitism, while Liddell—a devout Protestant—faces disapproval for his ultimate decision not to run on the Christian Sabbath. Meir Soloveichik comments on the movie, and the story behind it:

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Read more at Commentary

More about: 1936 Olympics, Anti-Semitism, British Jewry, Film, Sabbath

If the U.S. Doesn’t Stand Firm, It Will Face an Empowered Iran with Nuclear Weapons

In Vienna this week, negotiations continue between Washington and Tehran over how to reinstate the 2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), which aimed to restrict the Islamic Republic’s ability to develop the technology necessary for producing atomic bombs. Jacob Nagel and Mark Dubowitz explain the risks of a bad deal:

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Read more at Newsweek

More about: Iran, Iran nuclear program, U.S. Foreign policy