Preserving the Site of the Sobibor Death Camp

Currently, the grounds where the Sobibor death camp once stood are treated like a public park, where locals go to ride bicycles, take a stroll, walk their dogs—or dig in the dirt for bricks and other artifacts. Meanwhile, a group of archaeologists is excavating the site and plans are under way to create a memorial and museum. Some fear, however, that the latter effort will also cheapen the memory of the camp’s horrors. Matt Lebovic writes:

In the months ahead, large-scale construction will transform Sobibor forever, as authorities enact a long-incubated plan to build a museum, visitor center, and various memorial structures throughout the camp. “We don’t want this to become the Disneyland of death camps,” said Jonny Daniels, founder and executive director of the Poland-based From the Depths organization. “The treatment of this place as one where pets relieve themselves, in addition to the construction of huge new buildings on top of camp remains, is very disturbing. . . . You can’t build in a concentration camp.”

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Read more at Times of Israel

More about: Holocaust, Poland, Sobibor

Distrust of the Supreme Court Led Likud Voters to Rally around Netanyahu

Jan. 17 2020

A few weeks ago, Benjamin Netanyahu handily won the Likud party’s primary election, receiving 72 percent of the votes. He won despite the fact that he is facing indictments on corruption charges that could interfere with his ability to govern if he remains Israel’s premier, and despite the credible challenge mounted by his opponent, Gideon Sa’ar. Evelyn Gordon credits the results not to love of Netanyahu but to resentment of Israel’s overweening Supreme Court:

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Read more at Evelyn Gordon

More about: Benjamin Netanyahu, Israeli politics, Israeli Supreme Court