The Spirit of Jewish Particularism

Contemporary liberalism is a problem for Jews, but conservatism isn’t necessarily the solution.

Israeli Antiquities authority workers at a site in central Israel where a 1,400 year old wine press was found.  AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner.

Israeli Antiquities authority workers at a site in central Israel where a 1,400 year old wine press was found. AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner.

Response
April 20 2015
About the author

Yedidia Z. Stern is vice-president of research at the Israel Democracy Institute and professor of law at Bar-Ilan University. He is the author or principal editor of 20 books and co-editor (with Avi Sagi) of the journal Democratic Culture.


Eric Cohen is right to assert in “The Spirit of Jewish Conservatism” that Judaism and the Jews have a unique role to play in the world. The history of humanity attests to that role. Were it not for the contribution of Judaism—as a religion, nationality, and culture—and for the contributions of Jews as moral leaders, intellectual pioneers, cultural trailblazers, scientists, and producers of wealth and well-being, our world would be totally different, for the worse.

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More about: History & Ideas, Jewish conservatives, Particularism