Why There Is No Secular Substitute for Alcoholics Anonymous

The tools of reason, science, and common sense are not always accessible to an addict, and may harm him or her when they are.

John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images.

John van Hasselt/Corbis via Getty Images.

Response
Aug. 14 2017
About the author

Christopher Caldwell, a contributing editor at the Claremont Review, is the author of Reflections on the Revolution in Europe: Immigration, Islam, and the West  (2009).


Jeffrey Bloom, in “God, Religion, and America’s Addiction Crisis,” defends a religious approach to treating drug and other addicts, in particular the approach used in “twelve-step” programs patterned on the group Alcoholics Anonymous. Such programs have become a matter of considerable practical importance.

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