The Vichy Corruption

How American leaders in World War II picked up deliberately anti-Semitic policies from their Vichy French partners in North Africa.

Admiral Jean-François Darlan, Marshal Phillipe Petain and Air Marshal Hermann Goering after a meeting between Vichy and Nazi leaders at which they discussed the handing over of bases in French North Africa to the Nazis. Popperfoto/Getty Images.

Admiral Jean-François Darlan, Marshal Phillipe Petain and Air Marshal Hermann Goering after a meeting between Vichy and Nazi leaders at which they discussed the handing over of bases in French North Africa to the Nazis. Popperfoto/Getty Images.

Last Word
Oct. 30 2017
About the author

Robert Satloff is the executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and the author of several books on the Middle East, including Among the Righteous: Lost Stories from the Holocaust’s Long Reach into Arab Lands.


I am grateful to Michael Doran, David Pryce-Jones, and Michael Marrus for their kind, generous words about my essay, “The Jews Will Have to Wait,” and for endorsing at least two of its three core arguments: that Operation Torch, the November 1942 Allied invasion of North Africa, deserves greater attention both for its broader role in the history of World War II and for its narrower role in how, in the course of that conflict, the United States came to approach the “Jewish question.”

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More about: History & Ideas, Middle East, World War II