Does the New Testament Support Christian Zionism?

There are formidable new interpretive resources to make that case.

A Greek Orthodox monk stands behind a barricade at the entrance of the Edicule in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, on May 26, 2020. GALI TIBBON/AFP via Getty Images.

A Greek Orthodox monk stands behind a barricade at the entrance of the Edicule in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, on May 26, 2020. GALI TIBBON/AFP via Getty Images.

Response
July 20 2020
About the author

Jon D. Levenson is the Albert A. List Professor of Jewish Studies at Harvard University and the author of Inheriting Abraham: The Legacy of the Patriarch in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam (Library of Jewish Ideas; Princeton University Press).


Seeking a basis for reconciliation between Jews and Christians has been a much-pursued enterprise over the past few centuries. For the most part, the quest has been founded upon a mutual willingness to dilute religious conviction or bracket it altogether. In his stimulating essay on Christian Zionism, Wilfred M. McClay, one of the most perceptive observers of American culture, describes a new way forward for Jewish-Christian relations, one found among “people who have serious and unwavering commitments to their respective faiths and are not interested in coming together merely for the sake of achieving a lowest common denominator.”

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More about: History & Ideas, Jewish-Christian relations, Supersessionism