Israel and the Need to "Do Something"

Why the perennial temptation to do something, anything, to break out of uncertainty with the Palestinians must be resisted.

Israeli and Palestinian officers hold a field situation assessment in preparation for Israel’s 2005 Gaza disengagement. IDF.

Israeli and Palestinian officers hold a field situation assessment in preparation for Israel’s 2005 Gaza disengagement. IDF.

Response
Sept. 17 2015
About the author

Amnon Lord is an editor and columnist at the Israeli newspaper Makor Rishon and an editor at the online magazine Mida. His books (in Hebrew) include The Israeli Left: From Socialism to Nihilism (2003) and, most recently, The Lost Generation: The Story of the Yom Kippur War (2013).


The wide front of antagonism—military, diplomatic, and ideological—that faces Israel today is itself proof, if proof were still needed, that the “Oslo” turn undertaken by Yitzhak Rabin and Shimon Peres 22 years ago was a crucial mistake. They made that mistake despite their own many warnings in the 1970s and 1980s against precisely the sorts of dangers that, as if on schedule, ensued after the signing of the September 1993 Oslo accords and the creation of the Palestinian Authority. If great leaders can be maneuvered into such strategic traps once, it can happen again.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Israel & Zionism, Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, Peace Process