Everyone Loves Israel—Until They Don't

Yes, Israel’s popular right now. But most of its new friendships are based on assessments of common interest—and such assessments can change overnight.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a press conference on November 10, 2016. Dmitry AstakhovTASS via Getty Images.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a press conference on November 10, 2016. Dmitry AstakhovTASS via Getty Images.

Response
Nov. 14 2016
About the author

Robert Satloff is the executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy and the author of several books on the Middle East, including Among the Righteous: Lost Stories from the Holocaust’s Long Reach into Arab Lands.


Arthur Herman is right: Israel is hot—diplomatically, not just meteorologically. Old adversaries are burying the hatchet; new friendships are blossoming; and suitors around the world are jockeying for the attention of Israeli leaders, diplomats, generals, scholars, investors, consultants, and hi-tech entrepreneurs.

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More about: China, India, Israel & Zionism, Middle East, Russia