The Erosion of Public Trust in Israel's Judiciary Is Real—and Unusual

It’s hard to imagine a former justice in any other democracy trying to orchestrate a mass judicial resignation.

Aharon Barak, the former president of Israel’s supreme court, in 2010. Yossi Zamir/Flash 90.

Aharon Barak, the former president of Israel’s supreme court, in 2010. Yossi Zamir/Flash 90.

Last Word
Dec. 26 2016
About the author

Evelyn Gordon is a commentator and former legal-affairs reporter who immigrated to Israel in 1987. In addition to Mosaic, she has published in the Jerusalem Post, Azure, Commentary, and elsewhere. She blogs at Evelyn Gordon.


Many thanks to Haviv Rettig Gur and Jeremy Rabkin for their thoughtful responses to my essay, “Disorder in the Court.” Both make valuable points. If I begin with and focus the major part of my comments on Gur, it is because he rightly highlights a major contributor to the problem of judicial activism: namely, the Knesset.

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More about: Aharon Barak, Israel & Zionism, Israeli Supreme Court