Is Israel's New Nation-State Law Abnormal? Hardly.

In its definition of the nation, it follows a pattern common in the founding documents of many countries, including other advanced democracies.

Protests against Israel’s new nation-state law in Tel Aviv on August 4, 2018. Tomer Neuberg/Flash90.

Protests against Israel’s new nation-state law in Tel Aviv on August 4, 2018. Tomer Neuberg/Flash90.

Response
Oct. 18 2018
About the author

Jeremy Rabkin is a professor of law at the Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University.


Why all the outrage?, ask Moshe Koppel and Eugene Kontorovich in their essay about the uproar over Israel’s new Basic Law: Nation-State—a question they then proceed to answer with great cogency. I don’t, myself, see anything inherently objectionable in the new law. It does worry me, however, that a set of propositions aimed at solidifying constitutional norms in Israel should have generated so much contention. During my time in Jerusalem this summer, a number of Israelis told me they weren’t against anything in the law but were unsure it was worth all the commotion it provoked.

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More about: Israel & Zionism, Nation-State Law