What Unites People of Faith across Religions, and Divides Them from Others

The Joe Lieberman example.

Vice-presidential candidate Joe Lieberman and his wife Hadassah wave to delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles on August 16, 2000. Mark Wilson/Newsmakers.

Vice-presidential candidate Joe Lieberman and his wife Hadassah wave to delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles on August 16, 2000. Mark Wilson/Newsmakers.

Response
Jan. 23 2020
About the author

David Novak, an ordained rabbi, is professor of religion and philosophy at the University of Toronto and the author of, among other books, Covenantal Rights: A Study in Jewish Political Theory, Zionism and Judaism: A New Theory, and, most recently, Athens and Jerusalem: God, Humans, and Nature.


In his stirring essay “The Message from Jerusalem,” Eric Cohen seems to intend two audiences: a Jewish audience and a Christian audience. The better to appreciate how the essay speaks to each audience, let me first try to identify the kind of Jews most likely to agree with Cohen and, conversely, the kind most likely to disagree, and similarly the kind of Christians most likely to agree and to disagree.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Interfaith dialogue, Politics & Current Affairs, Progressivism