From “We” to “I”

The greater threat to Jewish mores stems not from same-sex marriage but from heterosexual promiscuity.

Painting of a marriage procession in a Russian shtetl by Isaak Asknaziy. Courtesy Wikimedia.
Painting of a marriage procession in a Russian shtetl by Isaak Asknaziy. Courtesy Wikimedia.
Response
Feb. 12 2014
About the author

Rabbi Shlomo Brody, founding director of the Tikvah Overseas Students Institute, is an Orthodox rabbi, a columnist for The Jerusalem Post, and a postdoctoral fellow at Bar Ilan University Law School.


Sam Schulman’s very thoughtful essay, “Same-Sex Marriage and the Jews,” reminds us of the centrality of procreation in the Jewish conception of marriage. Yet his thesis overlooks the other central component in the Jewish understanding of marriage: existential communion or, in plain English, love. This has broad implications, not all of them obvious, for his analysis of the approach taken by non-Orthodox Jewry to Jewish same-sex marriage, and for any thinking about how Jews and others might be re-attracted to the traditional marital framework.

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More about: Bible, Gay marriage, Homosexuality, Jewish identity, Jewish marriage, Sam Schulman