Ashkenazi Jewry

Some were more European than today’s Ashkenazim, other more Middle Eastern.

Amanda Borschel-Dan
Dec. 1 2022 12:01AM

Quotidian piety.

Eve Krakowski
July 15 2022 12:01AM

Destruction vs. redemption—and the remarkable survival of European Jewry.

David Berger
Oct. 25 2021 12:01AM

Including a “mazal tov” ring.

July 23 2019 12:01AM

If you don’t know what it means, you can probably figure it out. (Or you can read this column.)

Nov. 22 2017 12:01AM

Don’t call them feminists.

Julie Mell
Feb. 9 2016 12:01AM

While feasting and intoxication on the holiday of Purim are discussed in the Talmud, costumes are not. Yet dressing up has been a standard practice. . .

March 4 2015 12:01AM

Throughout his life, Ben-Zion Meir Hai Ouziel (1880-1953), the first Sephardi chief rabbi of Israel, held fast to a vision of breaking down the divisions. . .

Feb. 11 2015 12:01AM

The terms Ashkenaz and Sefarad are found in the Bible, but most likely refer to areas of present-day Turkey and Armenia, respectively. How did they. . .

Lawrence Schiffman
Jan. 22 2015 12:01AM

The questions of where and when Yiddish originated, and how it spread, were long regarded as solved. No more. 

July 8 2014 12:01AM

Ashkenazi Jews are forbidden to eat kitniyot—rice, corn, and legumes—on Passover, while Sephardim are permitted. Why?

April 7 2014 12:01AM

The theory that Ashkenazi Jews descend from the Khazars, a semi-nomadic Turkic tribe of the 10th century, is not only malicious; there’s also no evidence for it.

Shaul Stampfer
March 19 2014 12:01AM