Century-Old Lessons from a Jerusalem Pogrom

The Nebi Musa riots, which happened 100 years ago last week, killed five Jews, injured hundreds, and set a pattern for decades of anti-Jewish antagonism.

An anti-Zionist demonstration at the Damascus Gate in Jerusalem on March 8, 1920. Wikipedia.

An anti-Zionist demonstration at the Damascus Gate in Jerusalem on March 8, 1920. Wikipedia.

Observation
April 14 2020
About the author

Sean Durns is a senior research analyst for the Boston-based Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting and Analysis (CAMERA).


For Jews, the month of April is so crowded with anniversaries—from the Exodus from Egypt to the Warsaw Ghetto uprising—that it’s easy to miss one, especially this year, with the coronavirus pandemic sucking up so much attention. But even were this not so, one might be forgiven for having overlooked the hundredth anniversary, on April 4, of the outbreak of the Nebi Musa riots in Jerusalem. Named for the Muslim festival memorializing the birth of Moses on which they began, the riots left five Jews dead, 211 injured, and at least two women raped.

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More about: Balfour Declaration, History & Ideas, Israel & Zionism, Pogroms