The State Capitol Plan

Maury Litwack’s campaign to rescue America’s non-public schools and solve the Jewish community’s tuition crisis.

Children at the Jewish Family Preschool in San Francisco on March 13, 2009. Mark Constantini/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images.

Children at the Jewish Family Preschool in San Francisco on March 13, 2009. Mark Constantini/San Francisco Chronicle via Getty Images.

Observation
March 5 2021
About the author

Elizabeth Kratz is associate publisher and editor of the Jewish Link.


Maury Litwack greets each day with urgency, as though he’s in the last 48 hours of a hard fought presidential campaign. It’s as if every phone call, every strategy meeting, every speech encouraging high-school seniors to register to vote, and every conversation with a legislator could be the deciding factor. And after close to eight years at the helm of the Orthodox Union’s Teach Coalition, Litwack has changed expectations about how government can and should support non-public schools. In that time, Litwack has built in the Teach Coalition an entirely new education-funding-advocacy network, one that has long-term ramifications for how Jewish and other non-public school communities can and should partner with state governments to support their children’s education. If successful—and much of it already is—his work will relieve the debt burden that American Jewish families who send their children to Jewish schools suffer under.

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More about: American Jewry, Day schools, Jewish education, Orthodoxy, Politics & Current Affairs