The Long and Fruitful Literary Career of a Nazi Sympathizer

Dec. 16 2019

From the publication of his World War I memoir, Storm of Steel, in 1920 until his death in 1998, Ernst Jünger was a significant part of the German literary scene. But Storm of Steel also attracted criticism for its aestheticization of violence and romanticization of warfare—and praise from, among others, Josef Goebbels. Jünger served as an officer in the Wehrmacht during World War II, spending most of the war in occupied Paris, where he had a chance to socialize with the likes of Pablo Picasso. Reviewing Jünger’s memoirs from that period, recently published in English translation, Andrew Stuttaford describes his disturbingly ambiguous relationship to Nazism:

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Read more at New Criterion

More about: Anti-Semitism, Germany, Nazism, World War II

Israel’s New Government Flies in the Face of the Country’s Western Critics

June 17 2021

Commenting on the recent swearing-in of the new governing coalition in Jerusalem, Shany Mor writes:

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Read more at Newsweek

More about: Israeli politics, Israeli society