A Rare and Ancient Mosaic from a Greek Synagogue Goes on Display

First discovered in the 19th century, the mosaic floor of a destroyed synagogue on the Greek island of Aegina has recently been made available for public viewing. The synagogue belonged to a community of Jews who were precursors of the Romaniot—the Judeo-Greek-speaking Jews who lived in the eastern Mediterranean before the influx of refugees from Spain in the 15th century. Ilanit Chernick reports:

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Read more at Jerusalem Post

More about: ancient Judaism, Archaeology, Greece, Jewish art, Romaniote Jewry, Synagogues

The Israel-Sudan Deal Is a Blow to Both Hamas and Iran

While peace between Jerusalem and Khartoum is unlikely to bring the mutual economic benefits that accompany the deals with Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates, it offers much else to the Jewish state. Yoav Limor explains:

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Read more at Israel Hayom

More about: Hamas, Iran, Israel diplomacy, Israeli Security, Sudan