The Rise and Rapid Decline of Lebanese Jewry

In 2014, Beirut’s Magen Abraham synagogue was reopened with much ostentation. Politicians in attendance made grand statements to the effect that Lebanese Jews are as much part of the nation’s fabric as members of any other religious group. But only 29 Jews remain in Lebanon, and for the most part they fear unwanted attention. Ephrem Kossaify and Nagi Zeidan explore the past and present of this Jewish community, in an essay accompanied by numerous historical photographs:

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Read more at Arab News

More about: Lebanon, Mizrahi Jewry

Thoughts on Yitzhak Rabin’s Assassination, a Quarter-Century On

On the Jewish calendar, today is the 25th anniversary of Prime Minister Yitzḥak Rabin’s assassination at the hands of a fellow Jewish Israeli. Rabin, after a long and impressive career in the military and in politics, had not long beforehand signed the Oslo Accords, and was murdered by a zealous opponent of that decision. Reflecting on the occasion, David Horovitz writes:

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Read more at Times of Israel

More about: Israeli politics, Oslo Accords, Yitzhak Rabin