Three Decades after the Crown Heights Riots, Anti-Semitic Violence Still Flies beneath the Radar

Aug. 20 2021

On August 19, 1991, in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Crown Heights, a young Lubavitch Ḥasid lost control of his car, causing the death of a seven-year-old child of Guyanese immigrants. The accident—thanks in part to the incitement of Al Sharpton and other anti-Semitic agitators—sparked a three-day pogrom in which Jewish shops were destroyed, Jews were physically attacked, and one young Jew was fatally stabbed. Charles Fain Lehman notes what has changed since then, and what hasn’t:

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Read more at Washington Free Beacon

More about: American Jewry, Anti-Semitism, Brooklyn, Chabad

“I Had the Good Fortune to Be a Jew Born and Raised in the USA”

Nov. 26 2021

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who served on the Supreme Court since 1993, died on Friday at the age of eighty-seven. Among much else, Ginsburg was one of the most prominent Jews in American public life. Herewith, her remarks at the U.S. Holocaust Museum in 2004 on the occasion of Yom Hashoah:

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Read more at Washington Post

More about: American Jewry, Supreme Court, Theodor Herzl, Yom Hashoah