The Agency That Fights Religious Persecution Abroad Shouldn’t Also Fight Religion

Founded by an act of Congress in 1998, the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCRIF) makes policy recommendations to the president and State Department about how to help those suffering religious persecution across the globe. One of its nine commissioners recently resigned to protest possible congressional efforts to reform it that would leave it bureaucratically hamstrung. Clifford May, himself a former commissioner, explains why he believes the proposed changes to be wrongheaded:

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Read more at Washington Times

More about: Congress, Freedom of Religion, U.S. Foreign policy, U.S. Politics

 

The U.S. Has Managed to Force a Stalemate in the Syrian Civil War, at Least for Now

In a little remarked-upon statement in May, James Jeffrey, the State Department’s envoy for Syria policy, said that his goal was to turn the war-torn country into “a quagmire for the Russians.” By using economic leverage, this policy has achieved modest success, writes Jonathan Spyer:

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Read more at Foreign Policy

More about: Bashar al-Assad, Russia, Syrian civil war, U.S. Foreign policy