Why Israel Needs a Better Political Class

Its twin coronavirus and budget crises are problems caused by—and only fixable by—political leaders, not bureaucratic maneuvering.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Minister of Education Yoav Galant visit at a school in Jerusalem ahead of the opening of the school year on August 25, 2020. Marc Israel Sellem/POOL.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Minister of Education Yoav Galant visit at a school in Jerusalem ahead of the opening of the school year on August 25, 2020. Marc Israel Sellem/POOL.

Response
Sept. 29 2020
About the author

Evelyn Gordon is a commentator and former legal-affairs reporter who immigrated to Israel in 1987. In addition to Mosaic, she has published in the Jerusalem Post, Azure, Commentary, and elsewhere. She blogs at Evelyn Gordon.


Israel’s current political crisis exemplifies the maxim that hard cases make bad law. This case is desperate. Six months after the coronavirus erupted and nine months after the fiscal year began, Israel still lacks both a functioning contact-tracing system and an approved 2020 budget, mainly because Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is more worried about politics than the domestic problems that Israel now confronts. The government’s failure to perform these basic tasks obviously invites the conclusion that civil servants’ far-reaching powers must not only be preserved, but perhaps even increased.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel & Zionism, Israeli politics