How Cappuccino Got Its Name, and What It Has To Do with the Coat Worn by Ultra-Orthodox Jews

One word got turned upside down and downside up again.

A Capuchin monk making a cappuccino in Krakow, Poland, on January 6, 2013. BARTOSZ SIEDLIK/AFP/Getty Images.

A Capuchin monk making a cappuccino in Krakow, Poland, on January 6, 2013. BARTOSZ SIEDLIK/AFP/Getty Images.

Observation
Oct. 24 2019
About the author

Philologos, the renowned Jewish-language columnist, appears twice a month in Mosaic. Questions for him may be sent to his email address by clicking here.


Got a question for Philologos? Ask him directly at philologos@mosaicmagazine.com.

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

Create a free account to continue reading

Welcome to Mosaic

Create a free account to continue reading and you'll get two months of unlimited access to the best in Jewish thought, culture, and politics

Register

More about: Clothing, French, History & Ideas, Italian, Yiddish